View from the Porch

view from the cabin
“View from the Porch (RMNP)”

So much for beginning my weekly blog…guess it maybe alternating weeks. :) At any rate, here is my second watercolor and ink image from my artist residency at Rocky Mountain National Park last summer.

Suffering from an altitude sickness kind of headache, I did not want to waste any day, so I spent the day sitting on the cabin porch, wondering what I would see. Purple thistles were the most noticeable, along with Long’s Peak – stable subjects.

The reward of waiting and observing with patience resulted in appearances from more transitory visitors – a red admiral butterfly, least chipmunks, green towhees (I believe were anyway) and voles peeking out now and then under the grasses. I think they would fit well in a pocket, if they liked it, which they would definitely not. :)

A memorable part of the experience was a broad-tailed hummingbird male flying directly up to my face, then zipping away. He is a little tough to find in this image but he is present. Search and find. Have a seat at the porch.

 

Rocky Mountain Lakes Life

Scan 594
“Rocky Mountain Lakes Life”

A new year always brings motivation to start fresh so I have returned to my blog. For the next few weeks, my weekly post will be an image from my Rocky Mountain National Park artist in residence in August of 2015 and the story behind it.

“Rocky Mountain Lakes Life” is a collection of what I saw during a day of hiking up to Bear, Nymph and Dream lakes. The sketches began with the mountain in the center. My goddaughter was feeling the altitude so we sat and waited until she felt better. In the meantime, I pulled out my pencils, watercolors and micron pens, compelled to record the colors and the curvature of the rocky formation before us. It is a small sampling of the pinks, purples, greens, and yellows witnessed.

After my godchild had filled up on water and nourishment, we were on our way. The first lake on this popular trio of lakes trail is Bear Lake, a mere feet from the trailhead. I did not see anything here to paint, plus we were anxious to begin real hiking.

The next lake was Nymph lake; appropriately named, as all the yellow lily pads and glasslike mountain reflections opens up one’s imagination to the possibility of seeing magical creatures and lilliputian beings. While we did not see any of the former, I recorded ants, water skimmers, damselflies mating and a white insect (in upper right of image), of which I still do not know the name. This white one did hold a bit of magic though, as it skimmed across the water, rolled over onto leaves then sat upon them. This process was repeated more than once. I had to use my binoculars to draw it.

The final lake was Dream Lake. Here is where trout can clearly be seen, showing off their salmon pink, red and gold. I was also drawn to a tiny yellow flower amidst the roots of a tree. It was probably only about a half inch in size. A magnifier was required to see it for all its detail. I did the best I could in capturing it but there is more to be seen then what I have here. This is always the frustration with nature, there is so much present than one can possibly record. It is also what keeps me wanting to continue to observe. One always finds something new.

 

 

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More Sketch January – bird, fish, Annie

sketch january 13 raven

On January 13, a raven from Yellowstone National Park was inspiration (taken from my photo).

sketch january 15 fossil fish

“Dreaming Diplomystus Dentatus” on January 15.

An ancient fish that appeared to me to be sleeping, lost in a dream. Worked from my photo from Fossil Butte National Monument.

sketch january 16 sleeping annie

My dog Annie was too content and cute not to draw on the evening of January 16.  All dogs should be so happy.

Sketch January Highlights

After seeing a Twitter posting on a sketch January challenge, I decided to give it a go. Here’s a sampling of favorites:

sketch january 11 copy

“Gray Jay”  – pen and graphite pencil, 2015

Taken from my photo at Rocky Mountain National Park a couple springs ago of a very friendly gray jay, who sat by me, while I painted a mountain. I made a watercolor of him, too, at the time, since he was such a willing model.

The drawing/painting was created with Faber- Castell PITT pens, which are essentially india ink in pen form. Wonderful to work with, as they act like watercolors with their layering possibilities and drawing media for the control one has with line. The other two images below were drawn with the same media, along with a white wax pencil to add highlights.

sketch january 10 magpie copy

“Magpie” – pen, white wax pencil and graphite pencil, 2015

Another friendly bird who engaged me at Rocky Mountain National Park that same spring. I got out of the car to find this bird walking about me, displaying and showing off. I did not even offer him food. A special experience it was, though it normally is with most corvids. I guess he knew I loved magpies and his relatives.  :) He was starting to curve his head down in this moment.

sketch january 8 spider copy

“Spider on Cacti” – pen, white wax pencil and pencil, 2015

I found this little orb weaver amongst cacti at the botanical gardens when I was in Dublin, Ireland a couple years ago. I did not have time to sketch at the time, so she has finally been recorded here in a fine art format.  :)

As always, your respect is appreciated so please do not copy and reproduce without permission.

Thanks and happy drawing!

Milwaukee Public Museum Butterflies

sketch january 5 butterflies from MPM

“Milwaukee Public Museum Butterflies” by Kristin Gjerdset

Watercolor, pencil and ink, 2015

Yesterday, I painted a milkweed pod to turn my thoughts to spring days. Today, I experienced the warmth of summer, indoors, at the butterfly pavilion of the Milwaukee Public Museum. The subjects were much less cooperative in terms of sitting still, than would a dried botanical subject. However, the challenge is always good, to observe with care and attention. My only disappointment is that it was difficult to do justice to the complexity of their wing structure and pattern. But it was a joy to have them flying about, momentarily landing upon my arm, as I worked.

Here are photos of butterflies I saw:

MPM january buttefly 4 MPM january butterfly 1 MPM january butterfly 5 group view MPM january butterfly 5 MPM january butterfly 6MPM january butterflly 7

Milkweed Seed Burst

milkweed seed burst

“Milkweed Seed Burst” by Kristin Gjerdset

Watercolor, pencil and ink, 2015

With the ground now covered in white and the temperatures dropping to teens, I wanted to be reminded that spring will come again. Making an image of a milkweed pod I had collected in the fall seemed like a good remedy. And it was. As I worked, I thought about all the sleeping seeds and other animals underground, resting before they rise again. An essential rest so they will be strong and vibrant when the warm weather arrives. So I must be patient and appreciate the necessity of dormancy.

The Owl Pellet

pellet

“The Owl Pellet” by Kristin Gjerdset

Watercolor, pencil and ink, 2014

Walking the dog, I often find interesting subjects on the sidewalk; this owl pellet being one of them. I decided to make a study of the pellet itself then take it apart to determine what had been eaten.

In the top portion of the image, the largest blue and black form is the pellet intact. Scattered around are the hair and bones I found within. Much to my surprise, I found the hind foot of what looks to be from a cat. I was told by a local ornithologist, it is quite possible that this Great Horned Owl found a small cat for a meal!